“A book is a dream that you hold in your hands.” – Neil Gaiman

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I am a big reader, of lots of different types of books, and I thought it would be fun to read more about travel. This way when I am not travelling I can still get a bit of a “fix” through books. This page is going to include reviews on books that involve travel. It is my hope that it provides you with some fun and inspirational reading material that you won’t find anywhere else.

This is probably going to lead to blog posts on top travel books and best libraries or my favorite book stores. If you are like me, however, this will be a fun adventure all on it’s own! A lot of the travel related books that I have read have provided me with many “Aha” moments and have changed my life, helping me to fulfill my dreams and I want that for you too, So I hope you will come along on this mini adventure with me and Wander with Me!

Eat, Pray, Love – Elizabeth Gilbert

“Attraversiamo (let’s cross over)”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is one of my favorite books of all time so it’s only natural that I start with this one. I first heard about this book from Oprah’s talk show. Elizabeth Gilbert was a guest and she was talking about the book and at the time I thought, “Hmmm, I’m gonna have to check that book out sometime.” Then I kind of forgot about it. Several months, and possibly a year later I was in an airport and saw it on the shelf of a store. You see I have this problem where I cannot enter a bookstore (airport or otherwise) without buying a book. I always liken it to women and shoes. It’s a bit of an addiction. It just felt like the right time to pick this one up, like fate.

This book changed my life to say the least. Elizabeth Gilbert leaves behind her old life to travel to three different countries in an attempt to find herself. It will make you laugh, cry and want to eat good Italian food. It really resonated with me because it felt like at times she was describing my life. The three countries were complete contradictions to each other and provided a new insight into life.

Overall, I highly recommend this book to everyone who is looking for a change in their life and needs a little help pushing past the fear.

Thru hikers trilogy – Keith Foskett

 

 


This book is actually 3 books in one. Keith Foskett AKA Fozzie hiked the Camino, the Appalachian Trail and the Pacific Crest Trail and wrote about each experience. It was witty and engaging and even though all he was doing was walking I couldn’t put the books down. They were all special in their own way and brought different experiences in thru hiking to the fore front.

The Journey In Between


The first book was his hike on the Camino, the first in his thru hiking journey. I was instantly hooked on the thought of hiking this trail, with the casual trail, staying with the locals (camping or otherwise) and the adorable European towns that you traverse on your way to Santiago de Compostela. There are many routes to this final destination but he starts at Le Puy en Velay in France for a total of 1000 miles. He deals with blisters, language barriers and the Camino passport through his hilarious and truthful account of his hike on the famous Camino.

The Last Englishman


In the second book Fozzie takes us on a journey through the Pacific Crest Trail. This thru hike traverses from the Mexican border up the west coast to the Canadian border. It is 2,659 miles of tough hiking in dense forest. He introduces us to trail angels (former thru hikers that maintain sections of the trail and leave food for passing hikers) and the rugged terrain of the west. After reading this book I am not prepared to do this trail. It sounds ridiculously hard and at some points rather dangerous, especially if you are not churning out the mileage fast enough and get caught in the beginning of the mountain snows.

Balancing on Blue


The final book in the trilogy was his account of the Appalachian Trail. This 2,190 mile trail runs from Georgia to Maine, ending at Mount Katahdin in Baxter State Park, Maine. This trail has a lot of elevation changes, bears, and sections of wilderness with no chance to restock (namely the 100 mile wilderness towards the end of the trail).What I loved the most about this book was the stories of some of the other hikers he met along the way. It was how it changed their lives that had me hooked.

Overall, I highly recommend this trilogy for the hiking wanderlust in us all!

Life of Pi


People raved about this book. It was on everyone’s book club reading list. I, however, just wasn’t 100% sold on this one. It had some really neat concepts, including time he spent on a floating island. Basically, this kid ends up shipwrecked (after several chapters of his backstory) on an inflatable boat with a tiger. They somehow learn to live together on this boat and he manages his resources so they both stay alive. It’s an adventure across the Atlantic ocean. A lot of people loved this book but I just struggled to get into it. I would give it 3 stars. Let me know what you thought of it and check it out for yourself. In my experience, just because reviews may say it’s not that great a lot of the time I find I feel completely different about it.

The Stranger in the Woods

 

 

I received this book as a Christmas gift because I have a love of nature and an insane draw to being self-reliant and living my life on my own terms. This book was an interesting take on living as a hermit. It’s the story of Christ Knight, a guy who at the age of 20 decides to leave his life and disappears into the Maine woods where he lives for the next 27 years. It’s his tail intermixed with historical information on hermits throughout time. This book really struck home with me and the ending broke my heart. It hit me so hard I couldn’t help but cry. No…wait….sob. I’m not going to say anymore because I don’t want to give anything away. But I highly recommend this book for those of you who sometimes dream of just disappearing from society, living off the grid, and being in nature (even just for a hike).